For those of you who have read some previous CBSS blog posts, you’d know that I love to travel and I love to eat. I’ve never had a Christmas away from home, but have always dreamed of a white Christmas one year (typical right?). Anyway as I was having a discussion with my dear friend in Germany about her traditions, I thought it would be interesting to suss out what some other countries around the world eat on Christmas Day. Maybe you could skew away from Aussie traditions and try something new this year?

1. Germany

When I was in school I did an exchange to Germany, and have been back a couple of times since. Without a doubt, every visit I would see these love heart gingerbread cookies that ranged in different sizes hanging from market stalls. I later found out that during Christmas they become even more popular as gifts, and are often found at the Christkindlesmarkt (Christmas Market). Every time I hear about the Christkindlesmarkt it just sounds magical! Its very colourful and often filled with warm drinks, roasted chestnuts and hand crafts – one day I will make it there!

Christmas Markets

But until then I’ve tracked down a recipe for Lebkuchenhertz (the German name for Ginger Bread Cookies), that is popular in the German home around Christmas.

Christmas Cookies

 2. Austria

Germany’s neighbour Austria is just as beautiful with just as many delicious foods. The two places are quite similar and I’ve noticed that multiple foods are had in both countries, however I love these Austrian Linzer cookies from Martha Stewart. Named after the Austrian city Linz, and adapted from the Linzertorte, comes jam squeezed between two cookies. Don’t they just look nice and festive? I’m sure if I baked these up in preparation for Christmas Day they would be gone before Santa even climbed down my chimney (if only I actually had a chimney and Santa still visited me).

Click here for the star recipe, and here for the Christmas tree!

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3. Italy

I’ve never visited Italy, but it is one at the top of my list. Not only for the beautiful scenery, but for the food. Italian food. Oh I can just see myself packing on the kilos and enjoying every minute of it. Now this could very much be a stereotypical comment here, and I’m sure there is more to Italy’s Christmas traditions, but when I think of Italian Christmas my favourite thought is of a massive family (who are all brilliant cooks) coming together to enjoy the feast and festivities. I feel like if you’re born in to an Italian family you are born to be an excellent cook (again, another stereotype). When I went on a hunt to find THE Italian Christmas recipe I found too many to pick from, but I quite liked the sound of this Tuscan Panforte di Siena from The Brooklyn Ragazza.

Tuscan Panforte di Siena

4. United States (Alaska)

I’m still dreaming of that white Christmas… but this time I’m picturing myself in Alaska. That beautiful scenery, with snow covered mountains and trees, frozen lakes and BAKED ALASKA. Okay, so Baked Alaska is not traditionally a Christmas dish. It was created at Delmonico’s Restaurant by their chef-de-cuisine Charles Ranhofer in 1876 to honour the recently acquired American state. The dish is often made with sponge cake, or Christmas cake! Hello Christmas dish. Baked Alaska has been reported to be a tough dish to master, after all it involves ice cream and an oven… But here is a recipe from Martha Stewart if you’re willing to give it a shot!

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5. France

Ever wondered where that traditional rich chocolate log cake originated from? Well in France it is referred to as ‘Bûche De Nöel’, and has been around since the early Medieval era. The Europeans would gather together to welcome the winter solstice at the end of December. It was a huge celebration when the days became longer, signalling the end of winter. If you want to read more about why it is a log, jump over to History. If you just want to whip up this tatalizing concoction then check out this beautiful recipe from Indy Week. You’ll find that this type of dessert pops up around Christmas all across the world, I can see why (YUM!).

Yule Log

6. Puerto Rico

Eggnog seems to be very popular on the other side of the world, specifically in America. While I’ve never tried the (apparently) delicious drink myself, when I finally get that white Christmas it will be had for sure! Puerto Rico located in the Caribbean, have adapted the Eggnog recipe to suit their Island Holiday feel. It is called Coquito and is made with coconut milk and Puerto Rican rum. I feel like this could be one to adapt to the Aussie Christmas.

coquitoeggnog

7. Brazil

I’m not sure about you, but I see rum balls around at every Christmas party I attend. While these aren’t rum balls, they are next level – definitely something I want on my table this festive season. Known as Brigaderios, these chocolate fudge balls are made with condensed milk, butter and cocoa powder.  I have a really dear friend from Brazil, and she’s always telling me how amazing some of the food is from there and I know she would love a bite of these this year just as much as I would. I might just have to bake some of these up and use them for Christmas presents!

Brigadeiros1

8. Spain

As some of you know, I was in Spain earlier this year and it was incredible! You can read up on some of my time there here. Marzipan is a type of confectionary that is used for making sweets or covering cakes, primarily made out of almond meal and sugar. It is quite traditional in Spain around this time of year, so I’ve found a delicious looking dessert made with Marzipan – Marzipan Swirl Tart by SugarHero.

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9. Canada

How could I do a post about Christmas desserts around the world and not include Pumpkin Pie? Here is the all famous Canadian Pumpkin Pie that appears along with the Eggnog in every American Christmas Movie. This dish is served across Canada and the United States during Halloween, Thanksgiving and Christmas, with pumpkin being the symbol of harvest time. I love how Sally’s Baking Addiction decorates her dish with the maple leaf. Get the recipe here.

The-Great-Pumpkin-Pie-Recipe

Don’t forget to share with us what you’re baking up this Christmas by using the #cbsschristmas on FacebookInstagram and Pinterest!

Have a fabulous, sweet filled holiday.

-KJ